Michael II of Romania           Mihai al II-lea al României
 
The Only Son of Michael I of Romania
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King Michael of Romania has only one son Michael II of Romania who is also known as Mihai Von Hohenzollern II. Michael II descends from Queen Victoria, and the Prussian House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, which provided Romania’s first King, Carol I. King Michael I abdicated on December 30, 1947 and went into exile during communism. Michael II was exiled and raised under protection in United States. Mihai II is proud of his children and grand children that all continue to live in the United States. Now living in California, he continues to promote the interests and culture of his Romanian homeland and considers Bucharest his hometown. This is the official web site authorized by Michael II of Romania. Michael II is the Head of House for the Romanian branch of the Hohenzollern line by agnatic primogeniture law after the abdication of Michael I in 1947. However Mihai continues refer to his Father as King Michael out of respect only. You may contact Michael’s office at Mihai Von Hohenzollern II on facebook.

Contact Michael II's office: https://www.facebook.com/mihaivonhohenzollernII

 
  
Regele Mihai a fost silit să abdice la 30 decembrie 1947. Mihai II este singurul fiu al regele Mihai I al României. Mihai II s-a născut în Elveţia şi a fost crescut în America. Prin Legea salică, Mihai II devenit șeful Casei Regale de România după abdicarea tatălui său la 30 decembrie 1947.....JR, Site Administrator
   Michael II of Romania goes into exile in The US
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ELizabeth P. McIntosh Passes

"The Decoys"

"The Pope Objects To A Second Marriage"

"Our Mother"
Michael II opens up about his life

"A Dangerous Post War World"

"The Marriage"



Hungarian Jam Cake

     The following is a recipe that Michael II finally perfected. It was given to him incomplete.....the crust is similar to a Linzer.

Ingredients:

2 cups all purpose flour

1/3 cup of sugar

1 egg

1 heaping tablespoon sour cream

1 teaspoon baking powder

5 tablespoons unsalted butter

Jam …...Michael prefers a thick apricot



Directions: Mix the flour, sugar, and baking powder.  Add egg , sour cream. Chip in the butter. It is very important that the butter be cold......take a knife a cut chips into the flour mixture. Knead the mixture with your hands. A utensil will not do the trick. When the mixture is a smooth textured dough cut into three sections. On a floured surface roll the first section into a 9x9 rectangular shape that is about ¼ inch thick. Press this mixture into the bottom of a 9x9 pan (not greased). Carefully put jam on top of this layer....about 1/8 inch thick. Roll out the next layer as in step as .....and place on top. Place jam on top of this layer. Lattice: make ropes of the remaining dough. Roll them out to about ½ inch wide and 1/8 inch thick. Bake in 350 degrees for 30 minutes. When cooled cut into squares. This is very rich, so small squares are best.


Queen Maria II of Portugal


     King Ferdinand was the son of Leopold, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and Infanta Antonia of Portugal. ( Infanta is the Portuguese term for Princess ) To first go into the complex but well connected lines that Michael II got from his great grandfather, we will delve into the lines from his mother, Infanta Antonia; Michael's great great grandmother.

     Infanta Antonia was the daughter of Queen Maria II, who was the Queen Regnant of Portugal and the Algarves. She an important part of the ' House of Broganza .' Maria was born in Rio de Janeiro, the daughter of Pedro IV and I, the future King of Portugal and the first emperor of Brazil. Her mother was Maria Leopoldina, Archduchess of Austria.

     Maria II is the only European Monarch to have been born outside of Europe.



Infanta Antonia of Portugal was King Ferdinand's Mother Her Mother was the Queen of Portugal

  



Haemophilia And The Royal Families Of Europe

Queen Victoria passed haemophilia to the royal families of Europe through her daughters

 

      Haemophilia has many hereditary threads through the Royal families of Europe. Haemophilia, or more commonly spelled Hemophilia, is a genetic trait that prevents the blood from clotting properly. Thus, minor injuries such as a scrape or bruise could result in severe external or internal bleeding. The gene is most often passed from a mother, who is a carrier, to a son. It is most prevalent in males who rarely live to adulthood or long enough produce children. For the condition to appear in a female, she would have to receive the gene from both her Father and Her Mother.

     Queen Victoria passed this mutation to her son Leopold. Several of her daughters were carriers and passed this gene onto their son(s). The son of Czar Nicholas II of Russia received the gene from his Mother Empress Alexandra, granddaughter of Queen Victoria.

     Another example of haemophilia being passed to a royal family would be the case of Queen Victoria's youngest daughter Princess Beatrice. Her daughter Victoria Eugenie became the Queen Consort of Spain. The Queen tragically passed the gene onto two of her sons, Alfonso Prince of Asturias (aka Crown Prince) and Infante Gonzalo of Spain, who both died young of internal bleeding.

     When Michael II was born, the DNA double helix was yet to be discovered and so much remained unknown of how Haemophilia was passed. Though it was eventually determined that Michael did not have the condition and survived to adulthood, he was watched carefully throughout his youth for the signs. He did have severe nose bleeds and bruising, and clotting seemed a problem. When asked about this, he recalls that as a child he went regularly to the family physician who was always concerned about bleeding. Prior to entering university, the same doctor strongly warned Michael never to donate blood and to remember that his body could not tolerate the loss of blood. Fortunately the line of Michael II does not carry the condition.


                                

Left: Tsarina Alexandra of Russia passed Haemophilia to Alexi   Right: Queen Consort Victoria Eugenie of Spain passed Haemophilia Alfoso & Gonzalo


         


The Romanovs visit the Hohenzollerns to arrange the marriage of Carol II & Olga

Communism: The Erasure of the Royal Families of Russia and Romania

      When Russia turned communist in 1917 it sent a shock-wave around the world and was particularly sobering to the royal families or Europe, most of whom were very closely related to Tzar Nicolas II. Indeed the connection to the Romanian Royal Family, descending directly form Tzar Alexander II, is particularly close. When Tzar Nicolas II, his wife, and five children were murdered in 1918 the Bolsheviks organized an erasing of the succession lines with simultaneous murders of all the Romanovs they could get hold of. Children proved not to be exempt from the communist's wrath; for the Tsaravich Alaxei his family bloodline was more deadly than the prominence of hemophilia inherited from Queen Victoria.
       When the chill of the cold war replaced the armed conflict of WW II, the memory of the fate of Tsar Nicolas II and his family was still relatively fresh. Michael I was not naive. When he abdicated in 1947, King Michael's fate remained unclear until he learned he was to be exiled to Switzerland and not removed to Moscow for a mock trial followed by execution. Though political maneuvers and agreements by the west saved the young King, exiled royals remained of concern to the communists who wished to maintain their grip on Eastern Europe. The Romanian Royals were not exempt. As Princess Ileana of Romania and other expatriated Romanians gathered at an Orthodox Church in New York for Easter service in 1956, a communist gunman would take aim. The intended target was unharmed, though one in the congregation was killed and five others were injured in the attack. Being the next in the line of succession to be King after the abdication of his Father, Former King Michael I, Easter's attack made Michael II's safety a more serious concern. Abruptly, without explanation, the boy was moved from house to house to live temporarily with families unfamiliar to him until it was deemed safe to return home. “Only recently was it explained that the people I stayed with had a Washington connection. I was even told of others I had stayed with during that time in the fifties that I had almost completely forgotten.” The end of communism and the passing of time has diminished the perceived threat to the political structures of Eastern Europe posed by those of royal blood lines. However for those who lived with the threat of assassination, the memory remains strong.

At age 13 Alexei was murdered, Ileana dodged a bullet in 1956, and Michael was hidden